Ordinary time, Year B

Bishop Banda’s Homily -Solemnity of Christ the King

Solemnity of Christ the King
Patron of the Cathedral of Ndola

One day, during my tour of duty, a question was asked: Which lay group was doing better amongst the lay groups in the Diocese? After, an extensive discussion over the same; I said: “Does it matter which lay group was doing better than the other?”
Brethren, there are different ways of contributing to the building of the Kingdom of God here on earth and indeed in the Diocese of Ndola. However, there are some fundamentals which we cannot overlook – whatever the case may be, and in whichever interest group we may find ourselves in.

In the final analysis, the question at the close of our lives will not be so much as; which lay group did better than the other – or which lay group we belonged to, or which interest group we associated ourselves with. Ultimately, the question will be “did we serve Him in the neighbour? Our Lord will say:
“I was hungry, did you give me food? I was thirsty; did you give me a glass of water? I was a stranger, did you welcome me? I was naked, did you cloth me? I was sick; did you take care of me? I was in prison, did you visit me? (cf. Mt. 25: 31 – 46).

All other things though important and they need to be done, however, they are of secondary importance to this basic question, to which all of us will give an account at the final judgment. Therefore, do charity to everyone, regardless. When all is said and done, no matter what we would have achieved in life, the quality of our lives will come down to the quality of our contribution – be it in our families, in our communities, or in our society.

It is those little acts of charity that make us sons and daughters of God, capable of inheriting His kingdom. The ancient Chinese proverb says: “A little bit of fragrance always clings to the hand that gives you roses”. This means, when we work to improve the lives of others, we indirectly elevate our own lives in the process. Therefore, when we practice acts of kindness daily, our own lives become far richer and more meaningful.
Subsequently, our lives become more sensible and more attuned to the cries of others and their needs.

Today, we celebrate the Solemnity of Christ the King. We celebrate a king without a nation – but a king of hearts, who reigns in our conscience. Today, we celebrate the king of peace – a king that ushered peace by His self gift of peace to humanity and He invites us to emulate Him. Brethren, if our hearts are not at peace because of resentment and anger, or even hatred and revenge; it is time to turn to God and ask for forgiveness and healing. Sin and evil can never bring us peace of heart (mind) – but a spiral of misery and self injury.

Today, we celebrate the king of love, who knew how to love without limits. If we cannot love until it hurts, then we still have not learned to love like Jesus. If you love until it hurts, there can be no more hurt, only more love (Mother Teresa). It means, therefore going past what we feel and letting go of our own expectations of others. Despite everything, loving even the so called enemies. Jesus was the king of love per excellence and with a distinction. He conquered the world through His death, a shameful death on the cross

Today, we celebrate the king of mercy, with a merciful heart He showed mercy to all, even those persecuting Him, as He said: “Father, forgive them for they do not know what they are doing” (Lk 23:34). He forgave the weak, the suffering and the ignorant. As we celebrate His reign today, let us learn from Him, the great king, our model and example to become co-heirs of His Kingdom – co-heirs of peace; love and mercy.

9. May Christ the King, our Patron continue to guide, bless and protect us. Amen

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